Definition of Pressurized-water reactor (PWR)

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TeachMeFinance.com - explain Pressurized-water reactor (PWR)



Pressurized-water reactor (PWR)

The term 'Pressurized-water reactor (PWR)' as it applies to the area of nuclear science can be defined as ' A common nuclear power reactor design in which very pure water is heated to a very high temperature by fission, kept under high pressure (to prevent it from boiling), and converted to steam by a steam generator (rather than by boiling, as in a boiling-water reactor). The resulting steam is used to drive turbines, which activate generators to produce electrical power. A pressurized-water reactor (PWR) essentially operates like a pressure cooker, where a lid is tightly placed over a pot of heated water, causing the pressure inside to increase as the temperature increases (because the steam cannot escape) but keeping the water from boiling at the usual 212F (100C). About two-thirds of the operating nuclear reactor power plants in the United States are PWRs. For additional detail, see Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). '.

The term 'Pressurized-water reactor (PWR)' as it applies to the area of energy can be defined as ' A nuclear reactor in which heat is transferred from the core to a heat exchanger via water kept under high pressure, so that high temperatures can be maintained inthe primary system without boiling the water. Steam is generated in a secondary circuit'.


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Mark McCracken

Author: Mark McCracken is a corporate trainer and author living in Higashi Osaka, Japan. He is the author of thousands of online articles as well as the Business English textbook, "25 Business Skills in English".


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