Definition of Boiling-water reactor (BWR)

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TeachMeFinance.com - explain Boiling-water reactor (BWR)



Boiling-water reactor (BWR)

The term 'Boiling-water reactor (BWR)' as it applies to the area of nuclear science can be defined as ' A common nuclear power reactor design in which water flows upward through the core, where it is heated by fission and allowed to boil in the reactor vessel. The resulting steam then drives turbines, which activate generators to produce electrical power. BWRs operate similarly to electrical plants using fossil fuel, except that the BWRs are powered by 370800 nuclear fuel assemblies in the reactor core. For additional detail, see Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). '.

The term 'Boiling-water reactor (BWR)' as it applies to the area of energy can be defined as ' A light-water reactor in which water, used as both coolant and moderator, is allowed to boil in the core. The resulting steam can be used directly to drive a turbine'.


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Mark McCracken

Author: Mark McCracken is a corporate trainer and author living in Higashi Osaka, Japan. He is the author of thousands of online articles as well as the Business English textbook, "25 Business Skills in English".


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